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WHAT DOES A RECRUITER LOOK ON A RESUME


Have you ever wondered what recruiters look for on a resume? Companies have limited time to recruit for positions that they need filled. On average, recruiters spend up to six seconds scanning a resume, looking for specific things to answer their main questions. That is not a lot of time! Knowing what to put on your resume to make you stand out would put you ahead of the large applicant pool. We asked our Recruiting Coach Marnie and she shared the top five must haves for putting together a resume.

  1. Your work history. Your resume is in essence the history of your work experience, skills, abilities, and education. Recruiters primarily want to know about your longevity and dependability in positions. These traits should be easy to see on your resume. Marnie says that the first thing recruiters are looking at is a proper sequence of employment. They do not have much time to spend so your jobs should be listed in reverse chronological order. This means that the job you have now, or your most recent job should be the first thing the recruiter sees. Do not list your oldest job first. This will cause them to have to fish through your resume to find your most recent position. You also want to include the name of each company and the month and year you started and ended. If it is the position that you are working at now, then you would put your starting date and “current” or “still employed” for ending date. Also bullet points should include the content of what you did at each job. These points include the duties you did every day. In addition, do not just include what you did at the company, but also include what you did for the company. Your achievements should be included. For example, a salesperson should list what their gross sales were, their growth percentages, if they brought in a specific amount of new accounts, etc.  If you were in accounting, for instance, you need to be specific. Did you do job costing, accounts receivable, accounts payable, processed on average 40 invoices a day? Be sure to also use key words found in the job ad as you write your work history. 
  1. Contact information. Your contact information should be at the top center or on the top left of your resume. Your name as it is stated on your driver license should be on your resume. If you go by a nickname, you can put that in parentheses as well. Marnie said that she cannot tell us how many resumes she sees every day that do not include full names or contain a number that is disconnected. It is also important not to use your current work email as your email address. Your email address should be professional as well; hotmama69@hotmail.com is not a professional email address handle. An inappropriate email address can cause you to not be selected to move forward. In addition, check your junk folder frequently if you are actively looking for a job. Remember to use a good working number with a voicemail that has been set up and avoid using your current work number. 
  1. Skills. Marnie indicated that she prefers a skill section over a professional summary. She said that professional summaries have a lot of fluffy information. A professional summary that says “I followed company procedures and provided customer service to the best of my ability” does not indicate much about your actual skills. Indicate what your hard skills are with a few of your soft skills and certifications. I.e. if you are an HVAC Service Tech then you would indicate that you have your EPA, if you are an Electrician include your license, if you are an Accountant include your degree, software programs used, and skills such as AR, AP, job costing, etc.  If you have the skills required for the job, make sure it is highlighted and it is on your resume right at the top in your skill section next to your soft skills. Soft skills include skills such as communication, public speaking, teamwork, problem solving, active listening, etc. These are things that cannot necessarily be taught, but that you personally bring to the table for the job. Do not put a hard skill or a soft skill on your resume that you are not a hundred percent comfortable and confident in. These are things that you are highlighting that you are proud of, not things you want to be. You might be asked about them in an interview. 
  1. Education. In most cases experience trumps education so do not worry if you do not have a college degree. That said, your high school diploma should only be listed if you graduated high school within the last five years. However, if you went to a trade/high school or you did two years of college credits in high school to obtain your AA degree you may include it as you obtained a focused degree or certification program. If you have a degree and went to a two or four year university be sure to include the name of the university, what your degree was in, and when you graduated. If you did not complete the program be sure to indicate that it was not finished. 
  1. Address gap and work history. If you took time off work for school or to take care of a family member it is helpful if you indicate your reason for a gap in your experience.  Also, include odd jobs that you may have had during those times. If you took on a temporary job while searching for a new one, indicate that as those skills may be transferrable. Again, indicate the name of the company and the start and end dates.

We hope that these tips were helpful! Good luck on your job search!

DOES MICROMANAGEMENT WORK


There are various management styles. Micromanagement is a negative term that refers to a management style characterized by extremely close supervision and control of the minor details of a subordinate’s workload and output. Are you a “check with me first” type of manager? If you are not sure, let us discuss the difference between a micromanager and an effective leader. 

Micromanagers request to be copied on all emails while an effective leader should only be copied on relevant emails. If you desire to be an effective leader you should want to take responsibility of the outcome and results, but not control the way that every step is done. It is important to focus on the bigger picture versus the small details. A micromanager also lacks confidence in their team and feel that when somebody else does the work, they do not get good results. An effective leader provides feedback to employees and allows room for collaboration. 

A micromanager needs frequent updates, but an effective leader discusses deadlines with employees and why it is important to complete a certain task within a specific timeline. Micromanagers rarely asks for input from others. Simply put, they lack confidence in people, feel that they know better, and that they must be followed at all times. Effective managers realize the importance of asking their team for input. 

We all know that the majority of people do not like to be micromanaged. Micromanaging can kill your business. It will impact your employee turnover rate and people will simply not want to work for you. Think about it, would you want to work for someone that does not trust and appreciate you? A survey published by Trinity Solutions reveals that 79% of respondents were currently experiencing micromanagement in the workplace, while 69% out of that 79% had considered changing jobs. Another study done in 2014 by The University of Pennsylvania concluded that educated employees tend to work harder and better when they have control over their work schedule. Employees love when management show appreciation for their good work and effort. This also helps to create a good company culture. Simply saying “great job on closing that sales deal,” “I'm so proud of you,” or “impressive work” will encourage a positive and productive organizational climate. Keep in mind that moods are contagious. 

In addition, a recent study by Ernest and Young has revealed that team competition can create a healthy competitive work culture. We encourage healthy debate and open communication between teams. This can help people to learn from one another, share opinions, and simply bring new ideas to the table. Be sure to reward your best performers. We all know that the right compensation drives sales behaviors. Spiffs are a great way to push for results and encourage your employees to strive for higher performance. In order to use spiffs correctly, you need to set specific and clear expectations. Offer training and give employees the opportunity to learn more aspects of the company. Also show them their promotional path in the company. Using incentives is a key benefit to rewarding employees and increasing productivity. In return they will be happier, produce higher quality performance, and display loyalty.

So in conclusion, micromanagement is not your friend and will have a negative impact on your employees. Choose employee recognition over micromanaging and create a good work environment that rewards your teams. Contact us to see how we can help you bring your company to the next level.

HIRING FOR COMPANY CULTURE


There are various management styles. Micromanagement is a negative term that refers to a management style characterized by extremely close supervision and control of the minor details of a subordinate’s workload and output. Are you a “check with me first” type of manager? If you are not sure, let us discuss the difference between a micromanager and an effective leader. 

Micromanagers request to be copied on all emails while an effective leader should only be copied on relevant emails. If you desire to be an effective leader you should want to take responsibility of the outcome and results, but not control the way that every step is done. It is important to focus on the bigger picture versus the small details. A micromanager also lacks confidence in their team and feel that when somebody else does the work, they do not get good results. An effective leader provides feedback to employees and allows room for collaboration. 

A micromanager needs frequent updates, but an effective leader discusses deadlines with employees and why it is important to complete a certain task within a specific timeline. Micromanagers rarely asks for input from others. Simply put, they lack confidence in people, feel that they know better, and that they must be followed at all times. Effective managers realize the importance of asking their team for input. 

We all know that the majority of people do not like to be micromanaged. Micromanaging can kill your business. It will impact your employee turnover rate and people will simply not want to work for you. Think about it, would you want to work for someone that does not trust and appreciate you? A survey published by Trinity Solutions reveals that 79% of respondents were currently experiencing micromanagement in the workplace, while 69% out of that 79% had considered changing jobs. Another study done in 2014 by The University of Pennsylvania concluded that educated employees tend to work harder and better when they have control over their work schedule. Employees love when management show appreciation for their good work and effort. This also helps to create a good company culture. Simply saying “great job on closing that sales deal,” “I'm so proud of you,” or “impressive work” will encourage a positive and productive organizational climate. Keep in mind that moods are contagious. 

In addition, a recent study by Ernest and Young has revealed that team competition can create a healthy competitive work culture. We encourage healthy debate and open communication between teams. This can help people to learn from one another, share opinions, and simply bring new ideas to the table. Be sure to reward your best performers. We all know that the right compensation drives sales behaviors. Spiffs are a great way to push for results and encourage your employees to strive for higher performance. In order to use spiffs correctly, you need to set specific and clear expectations. Offer training and give employees the opportunity to learn more aspects of the company. Also show them their promotional path in the company. Using incentives is a key benefit to rewarding employees and increasing productivity. In return they will be happier, produce higher quality performance, and display loyalty.

So in conclusion, micromanagement is not your friend and will have a negative impact on your employees. Choose employee recognition over micromanaging and create a good work environment that rewards your teams. Contact us to see how we can help you bring your company to the next level.

TIPS FOR WORKING AT HOME WITH KIDS


As schools remain virtual or hybrid as a result of COVID19 and more companies are requiring that employees work from home, productivity can be a challenge. We all hope to never be that employee that is yelling at our kids while we think that we are on mute during a conference call. However, even if this has been you, we hope that these tips for how to successfully work remotely with kids at home will help! 

  1. Create signs. Signs placed on your door that say “in a meeting” or “do not disturb” would help with older children. Think about questions that you are asked often, such as, “what is for lunch or dinner,” and put those signs on your refrigerator. 
  2. Utilize nap times. Try to schedule your conference calls, online demonstrations, and important work that need more focused time during your younger children’s nap and sleep times. This would allow you to be less stressed and more productive. 
  3. Rotate toys. A good idea is to have toys in bins that you can rotate to keep your child interested. If you can, put a plan together with different toys that can be hidden for a few days, then rotate them, and suddenly they become the new toys! 
  4. Prepare food and snacks in advance. A great tip is to pack lunches and snacks ahead of time as if you are going to school and work. You can also label them so that everyone knows which is theirs. Prepare snacks and bottles for your little ones in advance also. That way you are not getting distracted because they cannot find a snack. It would also be great if you have a nanny help out as then your children will not be coming to disturb you during working hours. 
  5. Ask for flexibility in hours. If waking up before your family helps to get work done, then you might want to pitch that idea to your supervisor. Managers, try to offer some flexibility if your employees need a break to get their children ready in the day, feed them breakfast, etc. They can make up that time at another point during the day. 

We hope that these tips helped. Try to have fun while your kids are at home or let them have fun. We may want to yell at them because they are distracting us from work, but remember that they are just kids. Some of them are devastated that they are out of school as well. So let us be nice to them too. They are struggling as much as we are being at home. 
In the future we will look back at 2020 and say, “we did it!”

ARE EXIT INTERVIEWS A GOOD IDEA?


As a business owner you may be familiar with conducting interviews of applicants you are considering for an open position. However, we would like to share that conducting exit interviews is just as important as interviewing a potential new hire. If you have started to read and you are completely lost as to what an exit interview is, that is completely ok! That is why we are here!

An exit interview is an interview you conduct with an employee who voluntary decides to leave your company. Research conducted by Burke, Inc. shows that 91% of fortune 500 companies conduct exit interviews. They are a great tool that helps you to assess the overall experience that the employee had with your company. It also helps you to discover any bottlenecks or identify opportunities for how to improve the experience of future and current employees, which will in turn improve your retention rate.

Firstly, conducting exit interviews will provide you with more insight and opportunities for employee development. Very often we hear about candidates leaving their existing employers, just because of a lack of career growth opportunities, stagnation, and an absence of financial opportunities. According to Glassdoor, employees are about three times more likely to leave for a new employer than to stay and move into a new role at the existing company. A dynamic environment and constant changes are particularly important for millennials. In order to combat this trend, we recommend that you develop a career path roadmap for each employee. Early on in your employment relationship, show your employee how they can have a career rather than just another job with your organization. Map out specific goals that they need to achieve to get to the next level. Acknowledge their wins and continue to support them and dialogue about their growth potential.

During your exit interview, you may discover that the individual is leaving to obtain better compensation and/or benefits. If the employee mentions that they are leaving to receive higher compensation, it should at least be 10% to 20% higher. If they indicate that they are leaving for a lower rate of increase, then it is likely that compensation is not the only reason why they are leaving. It might be that your wages are competitive, but your benefits are not. An exit interview will help to uncover the real reason why they are leaving and will offer you more insight into how you can plan for the future by improving the retention of great employees. Very often poor management is the reason why good employees leave. During an exit interview, you may discover information about management issues within your company. If you find that you are having a lot of turnover within a particular department and during the exit interview employees are stating that they are leaving due to the management style of their supervisor, then it is your responsibility to protect your business by making sure that you hire and train managers that are the best fit for your company.

A quick Google search will reveal many exit interview questions. We recommend using some open ended questions. A great question is, “please complete the sentence. I don't know why the company doesn't just ________.” Another great question is, “was your time here longer, about the same, or shorter than you thought it would be when you first joined the company?” Base other questions on your company's culture and refine them to minimize bias and to probe for uncovered insights. After you ask the question, wait for the response. They may show you some simple ways that you could improve your company, and help you to come up with better practices and procedures to improve retention.

An exit interview also provides you with an opportunity to review all legal issues before the employee leaves the company. During this time, you can discuss their obligations with the company such as noncompete, nondisclosure or non-solicitation agreements, invention or patent policies, maintaining trade secrets, etc. This will help you to reinforce your legal protections.

In addition, exit interviews enhance your corporate brand by leaving a good impression on the exiting employees. In general, departing employees should be treated with respect and gratitude. This process can encourage them to recommend your company to potential employees, to continue to use your company's products or services, or maybe even create some new collaborations in the future. You always want your departing employee to leave on a positive note. You never know how your paths may cross again in the future. Now that you have come close to the end of this blog post you may be eager to begin conducting exit interviews. One question might be, who conducts these interviews? Usually your HR Manager would be the individual to conduct them. If you do not have an HR Manager, it might be a great idea to have a third party such as a consultant perform the exit interview. A good time to schedule it would be on the last day or two, before the employee leaves. It should not last longer than one hour. It is also important to do it in a private setting and one-on-one where the employee will feel comfortable and safe. The person conducting the interview should use a template document to record their notes and the employee’s answers. Finally, the information you receive during exit interview should be used for implementing positive changes within your organization. Managers should be encouraged to put their egos aside and to look at the information with an open mind. It is easy to feel offended when an employee chooses to work for a different company. However, the magic happens when personal feelings are put to the side and the information in the exit interview is used to improve business practices. Based on the findings, examine those areas of your business and determine if changes are warranted. The final goal is to retain valued employees, identify your reasons for turnover, and to create targeted retention. Exit interviews are important when the employee is already leaving the company. But what about stay interviews? How about interviewing your existing employees to make sure they are happy working for you? We look forward to sharing insight on that topic with you in the future! Stay tuned!